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Poetry, poets, writing -

Listen to Susie Wild narrate her poem 'The Carnivore Boyfriends', published in the Spring 2020 edition of Poetry Wales. Link here.  

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Poetry, Reviews, Translation, Wales Arts Review -

Earlier this month, our own Parthian poet Natalie Ann Holborow reviewed the recent collection Modern Bengali Poetry: Desire for Fire for Wales Arts Review. Her thoughtful commentary on the book is wide-reaching and perceptive, making a dip into its intriguing pages seem ever-more tempting. 

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"Tristan Hughes's Shattercone, a collection of nine fascinatingly interwoven short stories, set in Canada, the Great Lakes and in Wales, is a book of such distances – spatial and geographical, but also temporal, emotional, relational and existential." In this review of Tristan's short story collection, due for release in October, Laura Wainwright finds much to admire! "While Shattercone is a collection about distances, however, it is equally a book about connections; between human hopes and losses, choices and fears – ‘solitude and desire’ (in Solnit’s words). Themes, characters and events are recurring and interlacing.  Indeed, the experience of reading these...

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Dai Smith, Fiction, Parthian Books, Reviews, The Crossing -

"The Crossing is an engrossing read filled with interesting people" writes Sarah Tanburn in her glowing review of Dai Smith's latest novel. Filled with "muscular prose", it asks fundamental questions about both the past and the future of a Cymru built on coal and the strong backs of miners. "The Crossing demands we ask ourselves those urgent questions about the future even as we wonder who sired whom and who will come off worst in the next violent encounter. The reader needs to put in the time to follow these threads but the resulting tapestry rewards in its rich detail...

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Border Country, Fiction, Parthian Books, raymond williams, Wales -

"I learned what it was to love and leave a place after reading Raymond Williams." Originally published in 1960, Raymond Williams's novel about rural working-class life resonates with readers as much today as it did sixty years ago. For the author Lynsey Hanley, it exerts the same power whenever she re-reads it. "Williams’ novel is a world in one book: specifically, an intimate history of 20th-century working-class rural lives. It deals with migration, borders – both geographic and psychological – and the effects of industrial change on communal life. On first reading Border Country, I felt immediately bound up and...

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